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A Bibo Reader
 
The Alchemist: A Péter Forgács Film Retrospective
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( YIVO Institute for Jewish Research & Yugntruf)
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research & Yugntruf
City: New York

Additional Notes:
“The greatest threat to the rule of law is not the people outside it, but those uncertain and distorted situations in which [the law] becomes bad, contradictory, and hypocritical.”
—István Bibó

István Bibó, the great Hungarian political thinker of the 20th century, philosopher, and minister during the 1956 Hungarian revolution, was sentenced to life imprisonment, and later released under an amnesty. In this film, Forgács presents the sensitivity and insight of Bibó's social and historical analysis, and uses unretouched found footage to provide us with a poetic glimpse into the Hungarian landscape of the twentieth century. This film is winner of Best Director for Short and Experimental Film at the Hungarian Film Festival, 2002. With score composed by Tibor Szemzo.

A Letter to Mother
 
World War I -- Jewish Experience in the Trenches and at the Home Front
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society and Leo Baeck Institute)
Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society and Leo Baeck Institute
City: New York

Additional Notes:
A Letter to Mother (1939) is one of the last Yiddish films made in Poland before the Nazi invasion. The plot centers on the story of mother's persistent efforts to support her family, while her husband moves to America. After her family is pulled apart by severe poverty and the turmoil of WWI, she finally makes her way to New York in hopes for better future. A Letter to Mother was hailed by the New York Times as one of the best Yiddish films to reach America. It was the highest grossing Yiddish film of its time.

Discussant: Eric Goldman, Adjunct Professor of Cinema, Yeshiva University

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This film is part of a series, “WWI – Jewish Experience in the Trenches and at the Home Front.” Click here for information on the other films.

This program is part of our World War I and the Jews initiative. Click here for details.

assigned seating
Monday, October 21, 2013 through Tuesday, October 22, 2013
 
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Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( john meek)
john meek
City: New York

Additional Notes:
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CJH Test event 1
Wednesday, December 24, 2014 through Friday, December 26, 2014
 
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Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
City: New York

Additional Notes:
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Commissar
 
World War I -- Jewish Experience in the Trenches and at the Home Front
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society and Leo Baeck Institute)
Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society and Leo Baeck Institute
City: New York

Additional Notes:
was made by Aleksandr Askoldov in 1967, but was banned by Soviet censors for 20 years. The reason is the films sympathetic depiction of Jews. Commissar is a heartbreaking story of a Jewish family in backwater Ukrainian shtetl ravaged by war and pogroms. When a female commissar fighting in the Red Army gets pregnant, the Jewish family takes her in, as she is expecting to give birth and to return to the front. The film is remarkable for its beautiful cinematography, contrasting the domestic Jewish life with powerful images of the Russian Civil War.

Discussant: Jonathan Brent, Executive Director, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research

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This film is part of a series, “WWI – Jewish Experience in the Trenches and at the Home Front.” Click here for information on the other films.

This program is part of our World War I and the Jews initiative. Click here for details.

Creating History
 
Panel Discussion
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( YIVO Institute for Jewish Research & Museum of the City of NY)
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research & Museum of the City of NY
City: New York

Additional Notes:
How do art and scholarship shape oru understanding of the past? Artists and scholars Péter Forgács (filmmaker, Letters to Afar), Svetlana Boym (photographer, Harvard), Marci Shore (Yale), Steven Zipperstein (Stanford), and Amelia Glaser, moderator (UC San Diego) present their work and discuss how art and scholarship shape our understanding of the past.

Czechs, Slovaks and the Jews, 1938-48
 
Discussion
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
City: New York

Additional Notes:
To what degree did World War II answer questions of national belonging and minority rights in Europe that had helped fuel two world wars over the preceding decades? Historians Jan Lánícek, University of New South Wales, Sydney and Rebekah Klein-Pejšová of Purdue University discuss the revelations of Dr. Láníceks new book, Czechs, Slovaks and the Jews, 1938-48: Beyond Idealisation and Condemnation, including the stark choice between emigration and assimilation that Czechoslovak Jews faced in the wars aftermath.

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Wednesday, October 01, 2014 through Wednesday, October 01, 2014
 
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Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( "the john meek test")
"the john meek test"
City: New York

Additional Notes:
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Echoes of the Borscht Belt
 
Artist's Tour
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( Yeshiva University Museum)
Yeshiva University Museum
City: New York

Additional Notes:
From the 1920s through the 1960s, the Catskill Mountains, within easy driving distance of New York City, were a popular vacation destination for millions of Americans, many of them Jews. Known as the Borscht Belt, the resorts of Sullivan and Ulster County combined recreational activities with nighttime entertainment – especially stand-up comedy, which was born in the region's theaters and showrooms. At its peak during the post-WW II era, the region known as the Borscht Belt sustained more than six hundred year-round hotels, as well as over a thousand bungalow colonies and summer camps.

In this series of beautiful, richly textured, large-scale photographs, Marisa Scheinfeld documents the dramatic degradation of some of the most famous Borscht Belt hotels. The images reveal ghostly remnants of the glory years of the era, as well as powerful evidence of nature's claim on the resorts and their landscapes, and new uses to which the spaces have been put in recent years. Scheinfeld, who grew up in the region, began her documentary photo project in 2009; this exhibition marks the first time audiences can see her work on the large scale on which it was conceived. Echoes is complemented by original memorabilia and photographs from some of the Borscht Belt's most beloved hotels and resorts.

Free Fall
 
The Alchemist: A Péter Forgács Film Retrospective
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( YIVO Institute for Jewish Research & Museum of the City of NY)
YIVO Institute for Jewish Research & Museum of the City of NY
City: New York

Additional Notes:
Using the home movies of musician, photographer, and businessman Gyorgy Peto, Free Fall follows the story of a happy, optimistic Hungarian Jewish family in Szeged whose attempts at normalcy are slowly eroded by Hungarys anti-Jewish laws of the 1930s. Forgács reveals their determination, illusions, and hopes as the unimaginable unfolds, until the very last moments. This film is winner of the Grand Prize for Short and Experimental Film, Hungarian Film Week, 1997; Grand Prix, International Documentary Film Festival of Marseilles, 1997; and Best Documentary Fiction Prize, Hungarian Film Critics, 1999. With a moving operatic score composed and conducted by Tibor Szemzo.

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36 records found