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"What If" in American Jewish History and Contemporary Jewish Life
 
Live Broadcast Begins at 7:30 p.m.
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( The Bernard Revel Graduate School for Jewish Studies at Yeshiva University)
The Bernard Revel Graduate School for Jewish Studies at Yeshiva University
City: New York

Additional Notes:
Shown live on the Jewish Broadcast Service, this event will launch Professor Jeffrey S. Gurocks latest book, The Holocaust Averted: An Alternate History of American Jewry, 1938–1967 (Rutgers University Press).

The Holocaust Averted has already been lauded as a “provocative, path-breaking book… filled with familiar characters in unfamiliar and intriguing roles that is sure to challenge—and, quite possibly, to infuriate readers.”

This intriguing work considers what might have happened to the Jewish community in the United States if the Holocaust had never occurred and forces readers to contemplate how the road to acceptance and empowerment for todays American Jews could have been harder than it actually was.

Join the audience as Professor Gurock and Rabbi Golub explore many reasonable historical alternatives grounded in what is actually known about the tumultuous, catastrophic and climatic 30 years that bridge the beginnings of the Holocaust, the rise of the State of Israel and Israels triumph in the Six Day War, and what this novel approach to history tells about the real world that Jews live in today.

Book signing and collation to follow.

’We cannot ignore this opportunity for service’
 
Lecture
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society & Leo Baeck Institute)
Center for Jewish History, American Jewish Historical Society & Leo Baeck Institute
City: New York

Additional Notes:
In the late 1930s, Phi Epsilon Pi, a Jewish collegiate fraternity, undertook an expansive national effort to bring over dozens of Central European Jewish refugees who were previously expelled from universities due to the rise of Nazism. This aid work invites new frameworks for understanding American Jewish communal efforts on behalf of European Jewry in the years leading up to World War II. Shira Kohn, CJH Taube/Koret Early Career Scholar Fellow, will present new research. Rebecca Kobrin (Columbia University), respondent.

Burning Words
 
Dramatic Reading
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( Leo Baeck Institute and Center for Jewish History)
Leo Baeck Institute and Center for Jewish History
City: New York

Additional Notes:
In one of the first debates of the print era, Johannes Reuchlin, a humanist Christian jurist, clashed with Johannes Pfefferkorn, a Jewish butcher converted to Christianity and a willing tool of the Dominican Order in their quest to burn Jewish books. Magda Teter (Fordham) offers scholarly commentary on this multimedia dramatic reading of scenes from a play about zealotry, censorship, and religious tolerance.

Burning Words
 
Exhibition Opening
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
City: New York

Additional Notes:
6 pm: Exhibition Viewing and Reception
6:30 pm: Talk by Elisheva Carlebach, Columbia University

One of the earliest controversies in Jewish-Christian relations was the 16th-century debate over whether Jews should be allowed to publish books on Jewish theology. These discussions took place within the framework of the Renaissance and the rise of humanism, leading to a weakening of the Churchs influence on theology and science and emphasizing the importance of the individual. This talk will focus on Johann Reuchlin, a German scholar of the period, who strongly advocated in favor of Jewish books, stressing the importance of Jewish ideas in the Christian world. He appealed to fairness, reason and due process and was one of the first to place Jews alongside Christians as part of the discourse on legal and human rights.

CJH Gallery Admission
 

 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
City: New York

Additional Notes:

Flory's Flame
 
Film & Discussion
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( American Jewish Historical Society and American Sephardi Federation)
American Jewish Historical Society and American Sephardi Federation
City: New York

Additional Notes:
Meet Flory Jagoda. Her trilling voice invokes the soulful musical Altarac family, whose heritage stretches back to pre-Inquisition Spain. Florys Flame introduces us to the legendary Sephardi musician who shares her inspiring life story interwoven with original songs. Post-screening conversation featuring Flory Jagoda.

France, Jewish Identity, and the Holocaust
 
Film Screenings
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( American Jewish Historical Society)
American Jewish Historical Society
City: New York

Additional Notes:
Join AJHS as we present new documentary work, one complete and one in production, by American filmmakers, who examine Jewish identity in France today, revisiting holocaust memory and commemoration in France in the late 20th century/early 21st century. Highly relevant given recent occurrences in France, the two documentaries look at various ways of addressing and reclaiming the ongoing genocide trauma and resisting and combating violence.

Yellow Stars of Tolerance (Curt Fissel and Ellen Friedland, 28 mins) documents a project to preserve yellow stars that were painted during the Holocaust in World War II on a synagogue exterior wall in Normandy, France to terrorize the local Jewish community. A testament to that terrible chapter of history, he preservation project emerges against the backdrop of the 70th anniversary commemoration of D-Day in Normandy in June 2014.

Cojot (In production, Boaz Dvir, 20 mins preview)
A suspenseful character study, COJOT tells the mostly unknown story of a Parisian banker catapulted twice onto historys stage in 1975-­-76. His journey begins during World War II in Nazi-­-occupied France. It hits a fork in the road in Bolivia=when he hunts down ex-­-Gestapo Commander KLAUS BARBIE. It peaks in Entebbe, Uganda when Cojot plays a pivotal role in the 20th centurys most daring hostage-­-rescue operations.

Free Kids Holiday Shorts
 
The 18th Annual NY Sephardi Film Festival
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( American Sephardi Federation)
American Sephardi Federation
City: New York

Additional Notes:
Family Day: With something for all ages, the day begins with a free program for children to learn about upcoming Jewish and Persian holidays. For older children and people of all ages, the afternoon program features films about Bukharian veterans of World War II, a celebration of the Judeo-Moroccan musical tradition, and the magic of matchmaking.

11am: Free Kids Holiday Shorts! Join us for activities and giveaways after the films.

Babak & Friends: A First Norooz
Directed by Dustin Ellis
USA, 33 min
In English

Norooz, the Persian New Year, is a holiday for Persians of all persuasions, including Jews and Muslims. In this short film, Babak, a little boy, travels to the ancient capital of the Persian Empire, Persepolis, to learn about the traditions of Norooz and rejoice in the rich culture of Iran.

Be Happy, its Purim
Directed by Shari Rosenfeld
USA, 30 min
In English

Everyones dressing-up for Purim, so get out your costumes and join the fun! Presented by Shalom Sesame, Israels Sesame Street, Avigail is inspired by the story of Esther. Moishe Oofnik is his usual grouchy self…but who is that mysterious masked singer at the Megillah reading?

Gallery Admissions
 
CJH and YUM admissions
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
City: New York

Additional Notes:

Heritage Rediscovered
 
Lecture
 
Venue: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
Producer: ( Center for Jewish History)
Center for Jewish History
City: New York

Additional Notes:
More than a quarter-century has passed since the Communist regime collapsed in Slovakia. During that time the country has undergone dramatic changes, achieving its independence and joining NATO and the European Union: indeed, in 2016 it will take up the rotating presidency of the Council of the EU for the first time. How have these changes affected the life of the Jewish community, and what is the present condition of Slovak Jewish heritage? Dr. Maroš Borský from Bratislava, Slovakia's capital, will join us to discuss the overall situation of Jewish heritage, significant projects and future developments. In 2012, Dr. Borský established a new Jewish Community Museum in the citys only surviving synagogue, and currently serves as the museum's director and curator. He will speak about the success of the museum and describe how Slovakia's Jewish community has endeavored to preserve its precious heritage.

A native of Bratislava, Dr. Maroš Borský studied art history and Jewish studies in Bratislava, Regensburg, London, Jerusalem and Heidelberg. From 2001 to 2006, he was the curator of the Slovak National Museum – Museum of Jewish Culture, where he founded and oversaw a project to document synagogue architecture in Slovakia. Dr. Borský is the Director of the Jewish Community Museum and the Slovak Jewish Heritage Center in Bratislava.

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31 records found